FactReal

QUICK FACTS: Politics, News, Economy, Religion, History…for busy people!

Archive for the ‘History/ Heritage’ Category

Founding Fathers, Historical Documents, Our History…

Thanksgiving from Pilgrims’ Writings (Primary Sources)

Posted by FactReal on November 22, 2018

PILGRIMS’ WRITINGS SHOW THEY WERE GIVING THANKS TO GOD
Read the story of Thanksgiving from the primary sources – the Pilgrims.

* Pilgrim, Captain and Governor William Bradford wrote the manuscript ‘Of Plymoth Plantation’ [Of Plymouth Plantation]
Digitized page via State Library of Massachusetts:

Online version via Gordon College:


Modern translation:

“After this, on the 18th September, they sent out their shallop to Massachusetts with ten men, and Squanto as their guide and interpreter, to explore the bay and trade with the natives, which they accomplished, and were kindly received. The Indians were much afraid of the Tarantines, a tribe to the eastward, who used to come at harvest time and take away their corn, and many times kill some of them. They returned in safety, and brought home a good quantity of beaver, and reported on the place, wishing they could have settled there. (But it seems that the Lord, Who assigns to all men the bounds of their habitations, had appointed it for another use. And thus, they found the Lord to be with them in all their ways, and to bless their outgoings & incomings, for which let his holy name have the praise for ever, to all posterity.

They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercised in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports.”

*Pilgrim & Governor Edward Winslow wrote ‘Mourt’s Relation’ (Governor of the Pilgrims several times)
e-book: Mourt’s Relation or Journal of the Plantation at Plymouth (PDF)

Modern translation:
our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labors; they four in one day killed as much fowl, as with a little help beside, served the Company almost a week, at which time amongst other Recreations, we exercised our Arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deer, which they brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governor, and upon the Captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.

The journal Mourt’s Relation was:
– Written primarily by Pilgrims and Mayflower passengers: Edward Winslow, William Bradford.
– Written between November 1620 and November 1621.
– Describes the landing of the Pilgrims at Cape Cod, their exploring and eventual settling at Plymouth, their building of the Colony, their relations with the surrounding Indians, including the First Thanksgiving.
– Originally printed in 1622 under the tile A Relation or Journal of the English Plantation settled at Plymouth, is the first published account of the coming of the Pilgrims to the New World to settle Plymouth Plantation.

* From the Life and Time of William Brewster, ruling Elder of the Pilgrims who founded New Plymouth, the parent colony of New England, in 1620.

PILGRIMS DECLARE THEIR FIRST PUBLIC THANKSGIVING FESTIVAL IN 1621
In 1621, from the month of May of their first year to November, the prospects of the Pilgrim colony became gradually more encouraging: The first summer’s provisions were gathered; summer breezes and health came to the enfeebled survivors; autumn advanced. Thus, the Pilgrims decide to declare a three-day feast at the end of 1621 to thank God and to celebrate America’s first Thanksgiving Festival.

Text:
“At length, autumn being far advanced, and their first summer’s harvest of Indian corn being gathered in, they fitted their houses, and made their arrangements against the coming winter. And now, while some were employed in service abroad, and some in fishing, to furnish for each family a goodly supply, others again were engaged in hunting, procuring, among other game, water fowl, wild turkey, and venison. Of meal, or Indian corn, one peck a week for each person was the apportioned supply. Of other meal, or wheat, they had none; nor had they any mill for grinding; therefore their corn must be pounded or mashed by their own hands. Yet even this supply, being deemed sufficient for the present colonists, caused some of them to write home to their friends, in England, in more glowing terms than was prudent or warrantable. The effect was, that these descriptions of plenty induced subsequent emigrants to come without bringing with them their needful stores.

The provision for the little colony being secured for the ensuing winter, their governor set apart a day for public thanksgiving. Accordingly, with the fruits of their labors, the thankful feast was prepared, that all might in a special manner rejoice together, under a grateful sense of these tokens of divine mercy. It was their first thanksgiving or harvest festival in the New World. And we may well conjecture what were the feelings, and what the theme of the Elder, as, assembled in their “Common House,” he led the devotions of these worshippers, and spoke to them words befitting the occasion.

The occasion was likewise improved, as a fit time, to interest and favorably influence the neighboring Indians. “Among other recreations,” says Winslow, ” we exercised our arms; many of the Indians coming amongst us, and with them came their greatest King, Massasoit, accompanied by some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted. They also went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation, and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And though it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet, by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish our friends partakers with us.”

Thus are we brought to the conclusion of the first year’s trials, hardships, and sufferings of the pilgrim company, with the loss of life, and the present temporary relief.”

Source: Ashbel Steele, Chief of the Pilgrims: Or the Life and Time of William Brewster (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co, 1857), pp. 269-270.

MORE
More on the Pilgrims and God
– More digitized documents of the Pilgrims in Plymouth, Massachusetts via State Library of Massachusetts.

Advertisements

Posted in History/ Heritage, Religion | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Thanksgiving: Pilgrims Wrote how They Failed with Communism; Triumphed with Private Property

Posted by FactReal on November 21, 2018


The Pilgrims failed with communal ownership required by their investors in London. The Pilgrims succeeded until they instituted private property.
The Pilgrims’ venture to the New World was financed by an investment syndicate in London that required the Pilgrims to put everything into a “common pool” which after seven years would be divided equally between investors and Pilgrims. The investors thought this “common wealth” contract condition would increase their probability of collecting their dues by pressuring the Pilgrims to work for “everyone” instead of working for their own private properties.

However, once this “communal ownership” was put into practice, it did not increase productivity or community participation. Quite the contrary. This form of communism demoralized the Pilgrims, and gave rise to new problems (i.e., unwillingness to work, confusion, discontent, loss of mutual respect, etc.) — typical of societies that adopt communism/socialism.

In brief, the Pilgrims experienced the failure of communal property and decided to replace it with private property, which allowed the colony to finally flourish.

This drastic change was recorded by William Bradford, the second governor of Plymouth, in his journal Of Plymouth Plantation. Bradford also criticized Plato’s utopianism where private property would be abolished and citizens would be “guided” by elitists.
(Click images to enlarge them) (Scroll down for transcription)

Pilgrim Governor William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, 1623:

Modern transcription:

All this while no supply was heard of, neither knew they when they might expect any. So they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop than they had done, that they might not still thus languish in misery. At length, after much debate of things, the Governor (with the advice of the chiefest amongst them) gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves; in all other things to go on in the general way as before. And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number, for that end, only for present use (but made no division for inheritance) and ranged all boys and youth under some family. This had very good success, for it made all hands very industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been by any means the Governor or any other could use, and saved him a great deal of trouble, and gave far better content. The women now went willingly into the field, and took their little ones with them to set corn; which before would allege weakness and inability; whom to have compelled would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.

The experience that was had in this common course and condition, tried sundry years and that amongst godly and sober men, may well evince the vanity of that conceit of Plato’s and other ancients applauded by some of later times; that the taking away of property and bringing in community into a commonwealth would make them happy and flourishing; as if they were wiser than God. For this community (so far as it was) was found to breed much confusion and discontent and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort. For the young men, that were most able and fit for labour and service, did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without any recompense. The strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes than he that was weak and not able to do a quarter the other could; this was thought injustice. The aged and graver men to be ranked and equalized in labours and victuals, clothes, etc., with the meaner and younger sort, thought it some indignity and disrespect unto them. And for men’s wives to be commanded to do service for other men, as dressing their meat, washing their clothes, etc., they deemed it a kind of slavery, neither could many husbands well brook it. Upon the point all being to have alike, and all to do alike, they thought themselves in the like condition, and one as good as another; and so, if it did not cut off those relations that God hath set amongst men, yet it did at least much diminish and take off the mutual respects that should be preserved amongst them. And would have been worse if they had been men of another condition. Let none object this is men’s corruption, and nothing to the course itself. I answer, seeing all men have this corruption in them, God in His wisdom saw another course fitter for them.

RELATED
True Story of Thanksgiving: Thanking God and How Socialism Failed
THANKSGIVING – As Written by the Pilgrims: The Mayflower Compact, the Pilgrim journals, etc.
Pilgrims Set First Thanksgiving Day to Thank God (1621)

Posted in Communism, History/ Heritage, Religion | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

VETERANS DAY 2018: 100th Anniversary of End of World War I

Posted by FactReal on November 11, 2018

Today’s Veterans Day marks 100 years since the armistice that ended World War I.
Armistice (temporary cessation of hostilities)

History:

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938. Unlike Memorial Day, Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans—living or dead—but especially gives thanks to living veterans who served their country honorably during war or peacetime.

World War I ends:

At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the Great War ends. At 5 a.m. that morning, Germany, bereft of manpower and supplies and faced with imminent invasion, signed an armistice agreement with the Allies in a railroad car outside Compiégne, France. The First World War left nine million soldiers dead and 21 million wounded, with Germany, Russia, Austria-Hungary, France, and Great Britain each losing nearly a million or more lives. In addition, at least five million civilians died from disease, starvation, or exposure.

Remarks by President Ronald Reagan at the Veterans Day National Ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery on November 11, 1985:

“We celebrate Veterans Day on the anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I, the armistice that began on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. And I wonder, in fact, if all Americans’ prayers aren’t the same as those I mentioned a moment ago. The timing of this holiday is quite deliberate in terms of historical fact but somehow it always seems quite fitting to me that this day comes deep in autumn when the colors are muted and the days seem to invite contemplation.”

“It is, in a way, an odd thing to honor those who died in defense of our country, in defense of us, in wars far away. The imagination plays a trick. We see these soldiers in our mind as old and wise. We see them as something like the Founding Fathers, grave and gray haired. But most of them were boys when they died, and they gave up two lives — the one they were living and the one they would have lived. When they died, they gave up their chance to be husbands and fathers and grandfathers. They gave up their chance to be revered old men. They gave up everything for our country, for us. And all we can do is remember.”

“[T]he surest way to keep a peace going is to stay strong. Weakness, after all, is a temptation — it tempts the pugnacious to assert themselves — but strength is a declaration that cannot be misunderstood. Strength is a condition that declares actions have consequences. Strength is a prudent warning to the belligerent that aggression need not go unanswered.”

“Peace fails when we forget what we stand for. It fails when we forget that our Republic is based on firm principles, principles that have real meaning, that with them, we are the last, best hope of man on Earth; without them, we’re little more than the crust of a continent. Peace also fails when we forget to bring to the bargaining table God’s first intellectual gift to man: common sense. Common sense gives us a realistic knowledge of human beings and how they think, how they live in the world, what motivates them. Common sense tells us that man has magic in him, but also clay. Common sense can tell the difference between right and wrong.”

Posted in History/ Heritage, War & National Security | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Racist History of the Democrat Party (Video)

Posted by FactReal on October 27, 2018

YEP, DEMOCRATS FOUNDED THE KKK

Did you know that the Democrat Party:
– defended slavery,
– started the Civil War
– founded the KKK, and
– fought against every major civil rights act in U.S. history?

Carol Swain, professor of political science at Vanderbilt University, shares the inconvenient history of the Democratic Party:

Thanks to PragerU!

MORE:
HISTORY: First BLACKS in Congress were ALL Republicans (photos, bios)
LIST: Racism from Democrats
Log: DEMOCRATS’ RACISM & INTOLERANCE

RELATED
Fascism Belongs to the Left (Video)

Posted in History/ Heritage, Left, Racism, Right | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Fascism Belongs to the Left (Video)

Posted by FactReal on October 27, 2018

NAZI = NATIONAL SOCIALISM
– Nazism = National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus)
– Nazi Party – officially the National Socialist German Workers’ Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei)

Every Republican president since the 1970s has been called a fascist.
Ironic, no? After all, fascism has its roots in the left.

Dinesh D’Souza explains:

Thanks to PragerU!

RELATED
Racist History of the Democrat Party (Video)

Posted in History/ Heritage, Left, Right, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Vote for Kavanaugh is Easy: Where is the Evidence against him?

Posted by FactReal on September 27, 2018

EVEN AFTER TODAY’S CIRCUS-HEARING — THERE IS STILL NO PROOF KAVANAUGH DID SOMETHING WRONG!

On the accusations against Kavanaugh, we ask:

– What happened to: “Presumed innocent until proven guilty”?
– What happened to: “The burden of proving the defendant’s guilt is on the prosecution/the accuser’s team”?
– How do you prove a negative? (How can Kavanaugh prove he didn’t do what he is being accused of?
– Should people be able to destroy someone without providing evidence?

Even if a group of people wrongly accuses you – that is no proof you did it. We need evidence.

We must keep our belief in “presumed innocent until proven guilty.”

(Dark background: Today was a sad and dark day, when a man had to give it all to defend his reputation, family and future…all based on what “she said”…without no evidence.)

Video: Judge Brett Kavanaugh Opening Statement Defending Himself from Sexual Assault Allegations (Sept. 27, 2018)

Posted in History/ Heritage, Law, Left | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »