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Posts Tagged ‘Socialism’

Pilgrim’s Thanksgiving: How Communism Failed and Private Property Triumphed

Posted by FactReal on November 25, 2012

The Pilgrims failed with communal ownership required by their investors in London. The Pilgrims succeeded until they instituted private property.
The Pilgrims’ venture to the New World was financed by an investment syndicate in London that required the Pilgrims to put everything into a “common pool” which after seven years would be divided equally between investors and Pilgrims. The investors thought this “common wealth” contract condition would increase their probability of collecting their dues by pressuring the Pilgrims to work for “everyone” instead of working for their own private properties.

However, once this “communal ownership” was put into practice, it did not increase productivity or community participation. Quite the contrary. This form of communism demoralized the Pilgrims, and gave rise to new problems (i.e., unwillingness to work, confusion, discontent, loss of mutual respect, etc.) — typical of societies that adopt communism/socialism.

In brief, the Pilgrims experienced the failure of communal property and decided to replace it with private property, which allowed the colony to finally flourish.

This drastic change was recorded by William Bradford, the second governor of Plymouth, in his journal Of Plymouth Plantation. Bradford also criticized Plato’s utopianism where private property would be abolished and citizens would be “guided” by elitists.
(Click images to enlarge them) (Scroll down for transcription)

Pilgrim Governor William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation, 1623:

Modern transcription:

All this while no supply was heard of, neither knew they when they might expect any. So they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop than they had done, that they might not still thus languish in misery. At length, after much debate of things, the Governor (with the advice of the chiefest amongst them) gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves; in all other things to go on in the general way as before. And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number, for that end, only for present use (but made no division for inheritance) and ranged all boys and youth under some family. This had very good success, for it made all hands very industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been by any means the Governor or any other could use, and saved him a great deal of trouble, and gave far better content. The women now went willingly into the field, and took their little ones with them to set corn; which before would allege weakness and inability; whom to have compelled would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.

The experience that was had in this common course and condition, tried sundry years and that amongst godly and sober men, may well evince the vanity of that conceit of Plato’s and other ancients applauded by some of later times; that the taking away of property and bringing in community into a commonwealth would make them happy and flourishing; as if they were wiser than God. For this community (so far as it was) was found to breed much confusion and discontent and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort. For the young men, that were most able and fit for labour and service, did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without any recompense. The strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes than he that was weak and not able to do a quarter the other could; this was thought injustice. The aged and graver men to be ranked and equalized in labours and victuals, clothes, etc., with the meaner and younger sort, thought it some indignity and disrespect unto them. And for men’s wives to be commanded to do service for other men, as dressing their meat, washing their clothes, etc., they deemed it a kind of slavery, neither could many husbands well brook it. Upon the point all being to have alike, and all to do alike, they thought themselves in the like condition, and one as good as another; and so, if it did not cut off those relations that God hath set amongst men, yet it did at least much diminish and take off the mutual respects that should be preserved amongst them. And would have been worse if they had been men of another condition. Let none object this is men’s corruption, and nothing to the course itself. I answer, seeing all men have this corruption in them, God in His wisdom saw another course fitter for them.

RELATED
True Story of Thanksgiving: Thanking God and How Socialism Failed
THANKSGIVING – As Written by the Pilgrims: The Mayflower Compact, the Pilgrim journals, etc.
Pilgrims Set First Thanksgiving Day to Thank God (1621)

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Pilgrims Set First Thanksgiving Day to Thank God (1621)

Posted by FactReal on November 22, 2012

PILGRIMS DECLARE THEIR FIRST PUBLIC THANKSGIVING FESTIVAL IN 1621
From the Life and Time of William Brewster, ruling Elder of the Pilgrims who founded New Plymouth, the parent colony of New England, in 1620:

In 1621, from the month of May of their first year to November, the prospects of the Pilgrim colony became gradually more encouraging: The first summer’s provisions were gathered; summer breezes and health came to the enfeebled survivors; autumn advanced. Thus, the Pilgrims decide to declare a three-day feast at the end of 1621 to thank God and to celebrate America’s first Thanksgiving Festival.

At length, autumn being far advanced, and their first summer’s harvest of Indian corn being gathered in, they fitted their houses, and made their arrangements against the coming winter. And now, while some were employed in service abroad, and some in fishing, to furnish for each family a goodly supply, others again were engaged in hunting, procuring, among other game, water fowl, wild turkey, and venison. Of meal, or Indian corn, one peck a week for each person was the apportioned supply. Of other meal, or wheat, they had none; nor had they any mill for grinding; therefore their corn must be pounded or mashed by their own hands. Yet even this supply, being deemed sufficient for the present colonists, caused some of them to write home to their friends, in England, in more glowing terms than was prudent or warrantable. The effect was, that these descriptions of plenty induced subsequent emigrants to come without bringing with them their needful stores.

The provision for the little colony being secured for the ensuing winter, their governor set apart a day for public thanksgiving. Accordingly, with the fruits of their labors, the thankful feast was prepared, that all might in a special manner rejoice together, under a grateful sense of these tokens of divine mercy. It was their first thanksgiving or harvest festival in the New World. And we may well conjecture what were the feelings, and what the theme of the Elder, as, assembled in their “Common House,” he led the devotions of these worshippers, and spoke to them words befitting the occasion.

The occasion was likewise improved, as a fit time, to interest and favorably influence the neighboring Indians. “Among other recreations,” says Winslow, ” we exercised our arms; many of the Indians coming amongst us, and with them came their greatest King, Massasoit, accompanied by some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted. They also went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation, and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And though it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet, by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish our friends partakers with us.”

Thus are we brought to the conclusion of the first year’s trials, hardships, and sufferings of the pilgrim company, with the loss of life, and the present temporary relief.

SOURCE
Ashbel Steele, Chief of the Pilgrims: Or the Life and Time of William Brewster (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co, 1857), pp. 269-270.

RELATED
True Story of Thanksgiving: Thanking God and How Socialism Failed
THANKSGIVING – As Written by the Pilgrims: The Mayflower Compact, the Pilgrim journals, etc.

Posted in History/ Heritage, Religion | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

True Story of Thanksgiving: Thanking God and How Socialism Failed

Posted by FactReal on November 22, 2012

The Real Story of Thanksgiving is about giving thanks to God, NOT to the Indians. “Thanksgiving is a devout expression of gratitude grounded in the tradition of the Bible, both the Old and New Testaments. The true story of Thanksgiving is also about how socialism failed. And how faith, self-reliance, rugged individualism, and free enterprise resulted in prosperity.”
The True Story of Thanksgiving is about the Christian God and How Socialism Failed

The First Thanksgiving by Jennie A. Brownscombe

“The story of the Pilgrims begins in the early part of the seventeenth century … The Church of England under King James I was persecuting anyone and everyone who did not recognize its absolute civil and spiritual authority. Those who challenged ecclesiastical authority and those who believed strongly in freedom of worship were hunted down, imprisoned, and sometimes executed for their beliefs. A group of separatists first fled to Holland and established a community. After eleven years, about forty of them agreed to make a perilous journey to the New World, where they would certainly face hardships, but could live and worship God according to the dictates of their own consciences.

“On August 1, 1620, the Mayflower set sail. It carried a total of 102 passengers, including forty Pilgrims led by William Bradford. On the journey, Bradford set up an agreement, a contract, that established just and equal laws for all members of the new community, irrespective of their religious beliefs. Where did the revolutionary ideas expressed in the Mayflower Compact come from? From the Bible. The Pilgrims were a people completely steeped in the lessons of the Old and New Testaments. They looked to the ancient Israelites for their example.

“And, because of the biblical precedents set forth in Scripture, they never doubted that their experiment would work. But this was no pleasure cruise, friends. The journey to the New World was a long and arduous one. And when the Pilgrims landed in New England in November, they found — according to Bradford’s detailed journal — a cold, barren, desolate wilderness. There were no friends to greet them, he wrote. There were no houses to shelter them. There were no inns where they could refresh themselves. And the sacrifice they had made for freedom was just beginning. During the first winter, half the Pilgrims — including Bradford’s own wife — died of either starvation, sickness or exposure. When spring finally came, Indians taught the settlers how to plant corn, fish for cod and skin beavers for coats.

“Life improved for the Pilgrims, but they did not yet prosper! This is important to understand because this is where modern American history lessons often end. Thanksgiving is actually explained in some textbooks as a holiday for which the Pilgrims gave thanks to the Indians for saving their lives.” That’s not what it was.

“Here is the part that has been omitted: The original contract the Pilgrims had entered into with their merchant-sponsors in London called for everything they produced to go into a common store, and each member of the community was entitled to one common share.” It was a commune. It was socialism. “All of the land they cleared and the houses they built belonged to the community as well,” not to the individuals who built them.

“Bradford, who had become the new governor of the colony, recognized that this form of collectivism was as costly and destructive to the Pilgrims as that first harsh winter, which had taken so many lives. He decided to take bold action. Bradford assigned a plot of land to each family to work and manage.” They could do with it whatever they wanted. He essentially turned loose the free market on ’em. “Long before Karl Marx was even born, the Pilgrims had discovered and experimented with what could only be described as socialism.” And they found that it didn’t work.

“What Bradford and his community found was that the most creative and industrious people had no incentive to work any harder than anyone else,” because everybody ended up with the same thing at the end of the day. “But while most of the rest of the world has been experimenting with socialism for well over a hundred years — trying to refine it, perfect it, and re-invent it — the Pilgrims decided early on to scrap it permanently. What Bradford wrote about this social experiment should be in every schoolchild’s history lesson. ‘The experience that we had in this common course and condition,’ Bradford wrote. ‘The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years… that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing — as if they were wiser than God. … For this community [so far as it was] was found to breed much confusion and discontent, and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort. For young men that were most able and fit for labor and service did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without any recompense.'”

What he was saying was, they found that people could not expect to do their best work without any incentive. So what did they try next? Free enterprise. “Every family was assigned its own plot of land to work and permitted to market its own crops and products. And what was the result? ‘This had very good success,’ wrote Bradford, ‘for it made all hands industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been.'”
They had miraculous results. In no time they found they had more food than they could eat themselves. So they set up trading posts. They exchanged goods with the Indians. The profits allowed them to pay off the people that sponsored their trip in London. The success and the prosperity of the Plymouth settlement attracted more Europeans, began what became known as the great Puritan migration.

And they shared their bounty with the Indians. Actually, they sold some of it to ’em. The true story of Thanksgiving is how socialism failed. With all the great expectations and high hopes, it failed. And self-reliance, rugged individualism, free enterprise, whatever you call it, resulted in prosperity that they never dreamed of.

As read by Rush Limbaugh from his book See, I Told You So – something he does every year on the program, because the Real Story of Thanksgiving is still not taught at schools.

RELATED
THANKSGIVING – As Written by the Pilgrims: The Mayflower Compact, the Pilgrim journals, etc.

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Obamacare Regulations Cost: 30,000 Jobs Killed, $27.6 Billion…so far

Posted by FactReal on October 9, 2012

ObamaCare is not fully implemented yet, but it is placing billions of dollars in regulatory burdens on employers and on state budgets.

The Washington Examiner reported today on the findings of a study done by the American Action Forum (AAF) about the impact of Obama’s health care law.

Highlights:
● Obamacare regulations have already cost the U.S. economy $27.6 billion and more than 18,000 jobs.

● The top 10 most expensive regulations have cost $24.4 billion.

● Complying with the state health exchanges alone has to cost employers $3.4 billion.

● Obamacare regulatory compliance has eaten up more than 60 million hours in paperwork. At 2,000 hours a year that comes to 30,000 jobs.

● States bearing the largest regulatory burden in cost and lost employment:
— California: $3.4 billion in compliance costs and 2,917 jobs lost.
— Texas: $1.8 billion and 1,292 jobs lost.
— New York: $1.7 billion and 1,383 jobs lost.
— Illinois: $1 billion and 816 jobs lost.
— Florida: $1.6 billion and 978 jobs lost.

(Note: These figures are minimum costs, conservative estimates, and based on data provided by government agencies.)

RELATED
Obama Adviser Pushes for Death Panels in ObamaCare (NYT, 9/16/2012)

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WHAT IS THE TEA PARTY MOVEMENT? American Citizens Fighting for Freedom and Against Tyranny! (3 min. video)

Posted by FactReal on September 25, 2010

THE SLEEPING GIANT HAS AWAKEN! HAVE YOU?
Hat tip: John Schulenburg

Posted in Elections, Tea Party | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

What is Social Justice?

Posted by FactReal on May 16, 2010

Great article via American Thinker:

Social justice is the complete economic equality of all members of society. While this may sound like a lofty objective, what it really means is that wealth should be collected by the government and evenly distributed to everyone. In short, social justice is communism. It is rooted in the Marxist idea that the money people make and the property they own do not rightfully belong to the people who make the money and own the property. [emphasis added]

According to [Karl] Marx, money is really a “collective product” that belongs to everyone. [snip]

….[C]apitalism is seen by Marxists as a system invented by the rich to ensure that the poor do not get their fair share of money. Instead, the rich keep most of the money for themselves. In turn, the rich use this “stolen” money to selfishly purchase private property in the form of factories, land, houses, and anything else they choose. As such, Marxists see all privately owned property as the fruit of a massive capitalist fraud against the poor.

“Social justice” is intended to remedy this exploitation of workers by capitalists. Marx saw man only in a social context — meaning not as an individual, but as a part of a class. Thus, the word “social” (in “social justice”) refers to classes in a society.

“Justice,” in the Marxist context, means economic equality. This is the Marxist utopian ideal that all members in a society should receive the same amount of compensation, regardless of occupation, skill, or work ethic. [snip

Social justice can be accomplished in only one way in a capitalist society — by wealth redistribution. This is done by seizing the wealth of the greedy rich and giving it to the poor, using the government as the agent of redistribution. This is the true aim of the left’s social justice agenda.

The truth is that the only “class” in the United States excluded from reaping the benefits of capitalism is the class that chooses not to participate in American society. Fueled by the rhetoric of leftists, this class sits idle, dreaming of perceived wrongs that justify its inactivity.

>>read the whole article: American Thinker:

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